Instruction of children and youth in the existence and aims of the League of Nations.
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Instruction of children and youth in the existence and aims of the League of Nations.

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Published in [Geneva .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • League of Nations -- Study and teaching.,
  • International education.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Official no.: A.15.1926.XII.

StatementSupplementary report by the Secretary-General.
SeriesPublications of the League of Nations. XII.A. Intellectual co-operation. 1926.XII.A.3
Classifications
LC ClassificationsJX1975 .A25 1926.XII.A3
The Physical Object
Pagination18 p.
Number of Pages18
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5839627M
LC Control Number61055654
OCLC/WorldCa6888580

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